Old Russian unit of measure pud (пуд)

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Kimpula
Viestit: 233
Liittynyt: 31.01.2013 08:56

Old Russian unit of measure pud (пуд)

Viesti Kirjoittaja Kimpula » 01.10.2018 08:48

Finland had an old unit of weight "puuta", which is 16.38 kg. It is the same as Russian unit pud (пуд) (according to Finnish sources anyway :D). I have seen an unit "kilopuuta" (kilogram pud) or "metrinen puuta" (metric pud). Did Russia have anything similiar and if yes, how many kilograms it was?

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Arcobaleno
Viestit: 72
Liittynyt: 15.11.2016 01:14
Paikkakunta: Pskov, Russia

Re: Old Russian unit of measure pud (пуд)

Viesti Kirjoittaja Arcobaleno » 03.10.2018 22:24

Hello!
Here is the data from the Russian Wikipedia (translated into English):

Pud is an obsolete unit of measure for the mass of the Russian system of measures. Since 1899, one pound is equal to 16.3804964 kg.

1 pood = 40 pounds = 1280 lots = 3840 spools = 368 640 shares.
10 pounds = 1 Berkovets.

Berkovets -- from the old Russian name of the ancient Swedish trading town of Björkö -- the old Russian unit of mass.
Berkovets = 10 pounds ≈ 164 kg.

The weight measure "berkovets" was originally used primarily for weighing wax. Mentioned in the charter of Novgorod prince Vsevolod Mstislavich, this community of the “Ivanovo hundred hundred” merchants, who sold wax and honey in the transfer of the Church of St. John the Forerunner on Petryatin to the courtyard in Novgorod in 1134.
Subsequently found in Novgorod and Pskov chronicles.

With best wishes, Olga
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You don't have to pay for it. In return, I will ask you to decipher for me the text is in Swedish. I have many ancestors in Finland and I need help in reading old texts in Swedish. We can do a barter.
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Kimpula
Viestit: 233
Liittynyt: 31.01.2013 08:56

Re: Old Russian unit of measure pud (пуд)

Viesti Kirjoittaja Kimpula » 04.10.2018 08:08

Arcobaleno kirjoitti:Here is the data from the Russian Wikipedia (translated into English):
Thanks!

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